Research Highlights: June 2018

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Landsat 9 Thermal Infrared Sensor-2 Characterization

Joel McCorkel1, Matthew Montanaro1, Boryana Efremova1, Aaron Pearlman1, Brian Wenny1, Jason Hair2

(1: Biospheric Sciences Laboratory (618), 2: Instruments Projects Division (498) )

Figure 1
Figure 2
The TIRS-2 (Figure 1) spectral, spatial and radiometric response is derived using measurements made with the Calibration Ground Support Equipment (Figure 2) during subsystem level testing held Fall 2017 and Spring 2018 and instrument-level testing in Fall 2018 and Spring 2019. These measurements also characterize the instrument and provide NIST traceability for the on-board blackbody (Figure 3).

Name: Joel McCorkel, Biospheric Sciences Laboratory, NASA GSFC
E-mail: joel.mccorkel@nasa.gov
Phone: (301) 614 - 6675

References:

Technical Description of Figures

Scientific significance, societal relevance, and relationships to future missions:

The TIRS-2 instrument is a two-channel thermal imager that will provide global, geo-located thermal image data in the 10.8 um and 12 um spectral regions with 100-m sampling over 185-km swath. It will be one of the two primary instruments on Landsat 9 which will continue the legacy of the joint NASA-USGS Landsat Program providing Earth imagery since 1972. The TIRS-2 instrument leverages the design of Landsat 8 TIRS to provide similar measurements of the surface of the Earth with improved absolute accuracy and increased robustness and redundancy for a longer mission life. TIRS data are used by the science community to derive evapotranspiration products to evaluate water consumption on the field scale, assess droughts, and aide in water use management. These data are also used to track deforestation, assess volcanic eruptions and hazards, map urban heat fluxes, monitor and assess wildfires, track material transport in lakes and coastal regions, identify mosquito breading areas, and map power plant thermal plumes in waterways. TIRS-2 is designed, built, and managed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The characterization and calibration of TIRS-2 is lead, planned, and executed by personnel in the Biospheric Sciences Laboratory at NASA GSFC.


Operational support to ocean color missions

B. Holben1, G. Zibordi2, I. Slutsker1, D. Giles1, M. Sorokin1, T. Eck1, A. Smirnov1, J. Schafer1

(1: Biospheric Sciences Laboratory NASA GSFC, 2: Joint Research Center)

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Figure 2
The Ocean Color Component of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET-OC) was conceived to support the validation of satellite ocean color data products such as normal water leaving radiance and aerosol optical thickness through autonomous radiometric measurements performed from offshore platforms. The network, established in 2002 in collaboration with the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, currently includes more than 20 globally distributed sites located in different marine regions. AERONET-OC data are presently operationally applied by NASA to assess data products from a number of ocean color sensors (e.g., the Ocean Land Color Imager (OLCI) onboard Sentinel-3, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard the NOAA-20 satellite and the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) spacecraft). AERONET-OC Version 3 will be released later in 2018. It will improve calibration, quality assurance and support new measurements over fresh water.

Name: Brent Holben, Biospheric Sciences Laboratory, NASA GSFC
E-mail: brent.n.holben@nasa.gov
Phone: 301-614-6658

References:

Data Sources:

Technical Description of Figures

Scientific significance, societal relevance, and relationships to future missions:

The construction of Climate Data Records requires a number of actions allowing the scientific community to merge multiple mission data into a single stream applicable for climate science. Among these actions, in situ reference data for the assessment of satellite data products are of fundamental importance. AERONET-OC is an effective infrastructure supporting the continuous validation of satellite ocean color missions with real-time data. Uncertainty of these products is reduced with the improved AERONET Version 3 processing for atmosphere, land and ocean color applications.